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What Is The Best Beginner Fishing Rod?

Rose L. Rayner, Professional Blogger at Blogger (2014-present)

Answered Mar 19

You have to consider many things for choosing the best fishing rod. As there are a huge number of rods on the market, so it's not easy to find out the beat one. That's why I will discuss some tips to find the best fishing rod.

1. Shin | Rod action

Action describes much a rod flexes along its length and how quickly the rod tip returns to a neutral position when flexed. Rod action is affected by the rod’s taper, length, and the material the blank is made from. A fishing rod's action affects not only the type of fishing it is best suited to but how it will handle a fish.

Action describes much a rod flexes along its length and how quickly the rod tip returns to a neutral position when flexed. Rod action is affected by the rod’s taper, length, and the material the blank is made from. A fishing rod's action affects not only the type of fishing it is best suited to but how it will handle a fish.

2. Materials

Fiberglass vs. graphite and composites: Fiberglass is the most economical material for fishing rods offering a good compromise between light weight, sensitivity, longevity, and price. E- and S-glass are two common varieties of fiberglass, which are combined with polyester and epoxy resins to create durable, lightweight fishing rods. One step up in sophisticated materials is graphite, which is lighter, stiffer and more sensitive but also pricier than fiberglass. We like graphite casting/spinning rods because they are light and nimble, which is good for longer and more active fishing.

3. Length: Obviously, the longer the rod, the farther the reach and the longer the cast. You may have noticed the super-tall poles of 15 feet or more used by surf casters who need to clear rocks on the jetty and the surf line with their casts. On the other extreme, trolling for large tuna or other big game fish, the rods are stiff and short, simply because they are not used for casting long distances or clearing large objects.

4. Weight Class

A rod’s weight class is measured by the maximum line weight recommended and is shown on the rod blank in kilograms or pounds. A 5kg weighted rod suggests that you are targeting fish using up to 5kg rated fishing line.

5. Construction Materials

The Stubble | The rod grips and guides/runners are also made from a host of different materials, and while there are some technical differences and advantages, it may just come down to personal taste and how much you are willing to spend on your first rod. Materials like carbon fiber offer superior performance but might be outside your budget for your first fishing rod.

However you can follow this aarticle for more iinformation and for finding a rod which will match your need.

http://trollingpowersolution.com...

2.4k Views

Brian Sniatkowski, Been fishing for 50 years and boy are my arms tired

Updated Apr 11, 2016

Start with an inexpensive rod in the $30 to $50 range. If you want something that you can beat up and will be practically indestructible, the Shakespeare Ugly Stick is a good choice. You will lose a little in the sensitivity dept. with the Ugly Stick. If you want a rod with higher end performance but still won't cost a lot, the Berkley Lightning Rod is an excellent choice. It will be a bit more fragile than the Ugly Stick, but much more sensitive.

As Clinton Hayes said it can depend on what you are fishing for and where you are doing it. Assuming basic freshwater fishing for panfish, perch, trout, bass, pike, catfish, etc. I would look for a spinning outfit with a 6 to 7 ft long spinning rod.

Fishing rods come in a number of weights, ultra-light (UL), light (L), medium-light (ML), medium (M), medium-heavy (MH) and heavy (H). UL rods are suitable for panfishing (sunfish, crappy), perch and trout. Light lines (2-6 lb test) allow you to cast smaller lures and these smaller fish can put up quite a fight on UL tackle. For bass, pike, channel catfish, large trout, etc. you will want a ML through H rod, depending on the probable size of your quarry and the size of the lures you will be using. A ML or M weight rod with 6-12 lb test line will be the most versatile rod you can buy.

Another factor is the rod action. "Regular", "fast" and "ultra fast" are the most popular. This alludes to the bend of the rod. A fast and ultra fast rod will have a tip that bends a lot, but a lower part of the rod with little bend. A regular action will bend more throughout the entire rod's length. Fast and ultra fast give the sensitivity to catch smaller fish, but have the backbone to haul in a large fish. Regular action rods are more sensitive but fast action rods are more versatile.

Start with an inexpensive rod in the $30 to $50 range. If you want something that you can beat up and will be practically indestructible, the Shakespeare Ugly Stick is a good choice. You will lose a little in the sensitivity dept. with the Ugly Stick. If you want a rod with higher end performance but still won't cost a lot, the Berkley Lightning Rod is an excellent choice. It will be a bit more fragile than the Ugly Stick, but much more sensitive.

Choose a reel that is the appropriate size for your rod. Use the line lb test ratings on your rod to match it with a real that has a similar lb test rating. Shimano, Diawa, Pflueger, Okuma and ABU Garcia offer inexpensive spinning reels (under $50) that are of good to excellent quality.

2.9k Views

Mohdazizi Ahmad, blogger who does fishing

Answered Jan 29, 2016

if you a beginner and have a lot of passion in fishing. this is my suggestion.

buy an Abu Garcia Fishing rod. if you a inland fishing, length around 6 feet good enough.

then buy a Shimano Fishing reel, my suggestion Shimano FX 2500. a plastic but build very tough.

then have a look on this post about how to fish Barramundi. http://www.kpmbdr.com/2014/09/te...

1k Views ·

Clinton Hayes, studied at University of Florida

Answered Jan 27, 2016

It really depends on where you are fishing and what you are fishing for. If you are fishing flat water like a lake or a pond, go with a cane pole. Buy some small hooks, light line and light floats. Use live bait, whatever is available in your area.

I would also suggest buying a cheap light spinning combo. They can be had for around $25. Buy some beetle spins and spool the reel with some decent monofilament line. Practice your casting after setting up your cane pole. You will probably lose a few lures and learn to re-tie your knots while occasionally catching something.

Actually, just go to your local tackle shop and ask them. They can likely get you started for $50 -100 in saltwater and less than $50 in fresh. They will probably be able to point you to some decent spots to fish.

I would also suggest buying a cheap light spinning combo.   They can be had for around $25.  Buy some beetle spins and spool the reel with some decent monofilament line.   Practice your casting after setting up your cane pole.   You will probably lose a few lures and learn to re-tie your knots while occasionally catching something.

926 Views

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